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Success-Stories

HEKA Elektronik and The City University of New York Announce License Agreement

Chester, NS, Canada, and New York City, NY, USA – HEKA Elektronik and the City University of New York (CUNY) today announced that they have entered into a license agreement for the commercialization of the BRODERICK PROBE®. The BRODERICK PROBE® is a biosensor that enables direct, electrochemical monitoring of the release of dopamine, serotonin and a number of other neuro-active substances. These substances play a crucial role in understanding the function of the central nervous system, and changes in their release pattern may be a cause or a symptom in many disorders. Click HERE to read more.




FAQ

  1. What is IP?
  2. I have an invention, what next?
  3. TCO filed patent, what next?
  4. Should I publish or patent first?
  5. Would submitting a NTD withhold or delay publication?
  6. I want to start a company. Can TCO help?
  7. A company is interested in my work. How do I protect my IP when I talk to them?


1. What is IP?

The term "Intellectual Property" refers to a category of law that covers property rights relating to intangible things, implementations of ideas, various creations, works of art, etc. These things can be owned and legally protected against outside use or implementation without the owner's consent. For our purposes, generally speaking, CUNY intellectual property (IP) is protected under the constructs of patents, copyrights and trademarks laws, either nationally or internationally.

The concept of IP relates to the fact that certain products of human intellect should be afforded the same protective rights that apply to physical property. Most developed economies have legal measures in place to protect both forms of property.

Companies are wise to be diligent when it comes to identifying and protecting IP because it holds such high value in today's increasingly knowledge-based economy. Extracting value from intellectual property and preventing others from deriving value from it is an important aspect of building corporate wealth. Many forms of IP cannot be listed on the balance sheet as assets, but the value of such property tends to be reflected in the price of the stock. Management's ability to manage these opportunities effectively and to turn profits is an important determinant of a successful technology enterprise.


2. I have an invention, what next?

If you have an invention that has potential to be translated into a commercial product or process, we would love to hear from you. Please complete a New Technology Disclosure (NTD) form <doc>and send it to us by email or by mail. One of our associates will contact you to discuss your invention, protection of the invention and commercialization strategy.


3. TCO filed patent, what next?

Once TCO has filed a patent, the inventors are expected to assist TCO in its efforts to market the invention. Usually, TCO makes contact with the industrial partners that the inventors specify. However, successful commercialization of any technology requires active participation by the inventors.


4. Should I publish or patent first?

One should file a patent as soon as possible. Most countries in the word are “absolute novelty” countries. Once published, your own publication could be cited against your patent application. Hence, it is advisable to file a patent application before publishing the invention.

5. Would submitting a NTD withhold or delay publication?

We understand the importance and urgency of scientific publication. TCO is committed to avoid delays to publications.

6. I want to start a company. Can TCO help?

For any technology based start-up company, the most valuable asset is its Intellectual Property. TCO can help inventors protect their IP and for those who want to start a company, we can help you define your business model and coach you through drafting of a business/marketing plan. We can help you build a cogent presentation and can introduce you to angel investors or venture capitalists, and can even coach you through your presentations. CUNY also has some business incubator space which may be available.

7. A company is interested in my work. How do I protect my IP when I talk to them?

An inventor must be careful while discussing ideas with commercial companies. You should try to discuss only the matter that is already published and is in public domain. If you have to discuss the proprietary information, you should ask the company to sign a Non-Disclosure Agreement. TCO shall assist you to execute a Non-Disclosure Agreement.

Technology Commercialization Office
555 W. 57th Street, Suite 1407
New York, NY 10019
Tel: 646-758-7922
Fax: 646-758-7907
Email: INFO.TCO@mail.cuny.edu